7 junio, 2024

50 Examples of Hispanic American Regionalisms

The regionalisms They are terms or words that name an object or situation in a certain area. They are usually synonymous with other words that are commonly used in other areas. For example, in Spain the public means of road transport is called a bus, while in some Latin American countries it is called a bus or colectivo.

Regionalisms are a sign of the linguistic diversity of the Spanish-speaking community and exist thanks to the fact that there is a norm determined by the Royal Academy of Language (RAE). Without a standard, they would not be classified as regionalisms, but as general and common words.

The word «work» may have its equivalent in each Latin American country or group of countries. For example, in Mexico you can say «chamba» and in Argentina or Uruguay «laburo». And so it takes different forms in other countries.

Regionalisms tend to use what is closest and local that the inhabitants of a geographical area have forged. Some understand them as an exaltation of the land and the expressions that history and sociolinguistic processes frame a territory.

The cultural industry -especially television- have led characteristic words of a region to become popular for the entire linguistic community. On some occasions they have even been adopted by the dictionary as official words of the language in view of its mass use.

Psychologists explain this phenomenon from the perspective of «social learning», under which the constant reinforcement of behaviors, personalities and language slowly and unconsciously shape behavior and language itself, giving rise to the introduction of words from one country to another.

The word «tortilla» illustrates a perfect example for the Latin American and Spanish community; In Central America it is a corn-based food that has a flat and circular shape with which other foods are wrapped, while in Spain the word «tortilla» refers to a base of scrambled eggs and potatoes.

Examples of regionalisms

Pen-Pencil-Feather-pen
Children-Boys-Kids-Boys-Little-Boys-Boys-kids
Pig-Pig-Piglet-Pig-Pig
Work-Chamba-Laburo-Jornal-Rebusque-Changa-Pololo
Pool-Pool-Puddle
House-Home-Housing-Ranch
Shop-Business-Commerce-Establishment-Warehouse-Warehouse-Post
Truck-Bus-Volteo-Collective-Guagua
Nice-Beautiful-Good-Chido-Cool
Skilful-Dexterous-Smart-Handy
Money-Silver-Wool-Pasta-Copper-Marmaja
Kite-Flying-Parots-Chichigua-Kite-Pandorga
Spicy-Chili-Pepper-Chili
Depressed-sad-head down-Down-Agitated
Composite-Bogged-Grinded-Blasted
Conflict-anger-Problem-Lio-Royo
Homeless-Ragged-Dirty-Squishy-Lumpen-Pig
Pistol-Poplar-Guacharaca-Revolver
Computer-Computer
Badly dressed-Untidy-Facoso-Mamarracho
Crazy-Wacky-Insane-Outcast-Psychotic
Party-Jolgorio-Trifulca-Rumba-Foforro
Hyperactive-Restless-Impatient-Sahori
Bad-Useless-Irreparable-Damaged-Chafa-Cutre
Avocado-Avocado-Cura-Avocado-Abacate
American-Gringo-Yankee-Gabacho
Spoken-Speaker-Chorero-Snout
Park-Park-Accommodate
Empanada-Empanada-Cupcake
Drunk-Jumo-Fiero-Note
Silly-******-*******-Gil-*******-Gafo
Link-Win-Pattle-Squaring
Cotufas-Pochoclo-Popcorn-Kids
Great-Regal-Barbarian-Father-Chido-Great-Chevere
Panties-Bombacha-Calzón-Chones-Pantaletas
Posh-Concheto-Cuico-Strawberry-Sifrino
Perro Caliente-Hot Dog-Pancho
Sink-Sink-Sink-
Colleague-Buddy-Brother-Compadre-Cuate
Tapa-Minced-Snack-Snack-Pasa stick
Skirt-pollera-petticoat-sayal-lower
Pants-jeans-blue jeans-jeans-pitusa-denim
Casserole-pot-saucepan-boiler
T-shirt-flannel-shirt-shirt-shirt-casaca-sport
Peas-chickpeas-peas-chicharitos
Waiter-garçon-innkeeper-waiter-waiter
Corn-corn-cob-elote
Mesh-swimsuit-shorts-swimsuit-trusa
Plantain-banana-cambur-guineo-topocho-chocheco
Pin-clip-gacilla-unmissable-brooch-hook-harpita

More than 500 years after the arrival of Columbus on American lands, the expansion of Spanish was almost complete. However, the ancient inhabitants of the continent already had words and linguistic systems (or dialects) with which they designated the things around them.

In some areas, old words from indigenous dialects and those of the Spanish language have merged, giving rise to regionalisms and localisms. Some manage to cross local and regional borders, however, most remain in their geographic area.

Regionalisms vs Neologisms

Regionalisms should not be confused with “neologisms”. Neologisms are new words that appear at a certain moment in a language or a fixation of a new meaning for a term.

In general, the neologism must be valid for more than 10 years to be considered regionalism and to be admitted by the Royal Academy of Language.

Regionalisms vs localisms

It is important to delimit regionalisms from “localisms”; The former cover larger geographical areas such as countries and subcontinents, while the «localisms» are expressions of a specific region. In Latin America they are called states, departments or constituencies.

References

Americanisms (2017) Examples of regionalisms. Recovered from: americanismos.com.
Belly, R; Martín, P. (2010) Sociolinguistic history of Mexico. Editorial The College of Mexico.
Bonet, L. (1983) Literature, regionalism and class struggle. Editorial Castalia. Madrid.
Encyclopedia of Examples (2017) 20 Examples of Regionalisms. Recovered from: examples.co.
The Great Illustrated Encyclopedia (2016) Vocabulary. Recovered from: salonhogar.net.
Geek’s Room (2016) Different Words and Phrases to Name the same thing. Recovered from: geeksroom.com.
10 Examples (2017) Examples of Regionalisms. Retrieved from: 10examples.com.

Deja una respuesta

Tu dirección de correo electrónico no será publicada. Los campos obligatorios están marcados con *