8 junio, 2024

12 Dynamics of assertive communication (adults and children)

The communication dynamics assertive are very useful since they offer the opportunity to practice this communicative style and be able to generalize it in our relationships and our day to day.

Assertiveness implies that we respect the opinion of others and that, at the same time, we make our opinion respected. It is very important that we are clear and concise. Knowing the steps that lead to our speech being assertive and putting them into practice with different exercises, you will achieve greater success.

In this post I show you 10 dynamics to practice assertive communication that can be used in groups or individually, adults or children. Taking into account the objectives of each one and using them at the right time, they will be quite useful.

Using an assertive communication style helps us assert our opinion and be respected by the rest. This fact will positively influence our self-esteem and will have multiple benefits in the medium and long term.

Any leader must use an assertive communication style. In addition, assertive people tend to take the initiative and make decisions within the group. You may also be interested in these leadership dynamics or these self-esteem dynamics.

List of dynamics to practice assertive communication

1- Assertive rights

Goals

Develop self-awareness.

Learn to assert personal opinion starting from a situation of respect.

Time required

Around 60 minutes.

group size

Unlimited.

Place

Ample space in which participants can work in subgroups.

Necessary materials

Sheets and pen for each participant.

Steps to follow:

The group facilitator asks each member of the group, individually, to write on a piece of paper the rights that they consider they have in the family, at work and within society.

The group is divided into subgroups, depending on the number of participants and they are asked to identify five rights that they have in common in the areas mentioned above (family, work and society).

After the time previously agreed upon, each group presents their conclusions. Group discussion is encouraged.

The facilitator asks them, once again, to get into groups and think about what rights the people around the family, work context and society in general have.

Once they have finished, they discuss how we can respect others, making ourselves respected.

2- Climbing

Aim

Practice communication in a tense situation.

Time required

90 minutes approximately.

group size

Unlimited.

Place

Ample space in which participants can work in subgroups.

Necessary materials

Sheets and pen for each participant.

Steps to follow:

The facilitator presents the objective of the dynamic and guides a brainstorm about situations in which we feel tense.

Next, he defines assertive communication and presents a series of tips and formulas. It is recommended to practice with a couple of examples.

Each one, individually, writes a situation (real or hypothetical) that causes them tension and in which they would like to practice assertive communication.

Subgroups of between 4 and 6 participants are formed. Each one, in the subgroup, will share the situation with their classmates.

Within the subgroup, two lines will be formed so that on one side there is a couple and on the other, the rest of the members of the subgroup. The group facilitator will designate one row as “disputing” in which from left to right there will be a gradient of degrees of dispute, from the mildest to the most severe.

In the other row are the volunteer and his partner. The volunteer must describe the stress situation that he chose and will respond to each disputant in turn, responding assertively.

The volunteer’s partner offers support and makes sure that the disputants understand what the volunteer is exposing. In addition, he offers feedback to the volunteer on how he is doing.

A debate takes place with the large group in which the elements that have hindered communication are identified and what tools and strategies have been used.

If more time is available, the dynamic is repeated, changing the roles of each one within the subgroup so that they can experience different points of view.

3- Photoprojection

Goals

Allow each person to express themselves freely.

Identify how each one identifies.

Time required

Around 20 minutes.

Group size: unlimited.

Place

Ample space in which participants can work in subgroups.

Necessary materials

For each subgroup, a photograph of something that allows the participants to imagine a situation. Also, paper, pens and a blackboard with a marker or chalk.

Steps to follow:

The facilitator divides the group into subgroups, based on the number of participants in the activity.

He offers each subgroup a photograph and asks them individually to write down what happened before the photo, what happens at the time of the photo, and what will happen after.

When they have finished, one by one they share their story with their classmates. They discuss among themselves and try to reach a common situation.

Each subgroup chooses a partner to present in front of the other partners.

Discussion: the facilitator should guide the debate so that everyone can apply these situations to their daily lives.

4- Passive, aggressive and assertive

Aim

Distinguish between the different types of communication.

Time required

Around 120 minutes.

group size

Unlimited.

Place

Ample space in which participants can work in subgroups.

Necessary materials

Paper, pens and a blackboard with a marker or chalk.

Steps to follow:

The facilitator leads a brainstorm about assertiveness.

Then, individually, each one must think of the most submissive person they know and write down characteristics about their behavior.

They are asked to all get up and act from one side of the classroom or room to the other with a submissive attitude, using exclusively non-verbal language.

The facilitator asks them to stand still, like statues, adopting a submissive gesture. He is commenting and taking note of how the group has characterized this behavior.

It then changes from submissive to aggressive behavior. Previously, they have to individually write the characteristics of aggressive communication.

Again, they have to remain paralyzed and the facilitator will comment and ask for the collaboration of the group to take notes.

The members of the group take seats and prepare, as a group, a list of behaviors of an assertive person, especially in relation to non-verbal behavior.

Again, they have to move around the classroom taking an assertive and silent attitude. The facilitator repeats asking them to stand like statues and taking note of non-verbal behavior.

The facilitator leads a debate in which the different communication styles are analyzed and how the participants in the dynamics have felt in each of them. Subsequently, situations in which the behavior is assertive are introduced and practiced. Also, examples of situations in which to practice the assertive style can be used.

5- Collective history

Goals

Share feelings with the rest of the classmates.

Create a common story.

Strengthen bonds and relationships.

Time required

Around 30 minutes.

group size

Unlimited.

Place

Ample space in which group members can sit in a circle.

Necessary materials

A ball of wool.

Steps to follow:

The group facilitator will introduce the topic in question. This technique is applicable in different areas and moments through which a group passes. The important thing is that there is trust and everyone can express themselves freely. For example, it can be used as an outlet, emotional expression, to close a group, etc.

It consists of the person who has the ball of wool sharing what they want with the group and keeping the end of the ball.

Next, you must pass the ball to the partner you want.

He must comment what he wants and grab the ball. He will then pass it on to another partner.

The dynamic ends when everyone has participated.

The final reflection must be accompanied by the fabric that is born around a team and the relationships that arise within it.

6- 3 steps towards assertiveness

Aim

Practice assertiveness.

Time required

Around 30 minutes.

group size

Unlimited.

Place

Large room or classroom.

Necessary materials

Paper, pens and a blackboard with a marker or chalk.

Steps to follow:

The facilitator exposes the three steps that lead the assertive dialogue. Express feelings, ask what we want to happen and say how we would feel after the change.

Everyday situations in personal and work life that usually generate conflict are exposed and, among all, they are resolved through assertive dialogue.

Other comments: it can be done first in subgroups or individually and then, solve and discuss the situations with the rest of the classmates.

7- Obstacles

Goals

Identify the obstacles that appear in the communicative process.

Develop tools and instruments to solve them.

Time required

Around 45 minutes.

group size

Unlimited.

Place

Large room or classroom.

Necessary materials

Paper, pens and a blackboard with a marker or chalk.

Steps to follow:

The facilitator introduces the dynamics by explaining that they have to think about situations in which they have not felt satisfied with a conversation or communicative process.

Each person shares with the group and, together, they identify which elements or situations led to failure.

Some of the examples presented are mimicked below. It can be individually or in a group.

The person whose example is being performed must alter the state of the figures towards assertive communication.

Finally, a debate is held in which everyone can express their opinion and feelings.

8- Dialogue drawn

Aim

Promote creativity and empathy.

Use drawing as a method of expression.

Time required

Around 30 minutes.

group size

Unlimited. It is important that they get to know each other.

Place

Large room or classroom.

Necessary materials

Colors (markers or pencils) and continuous paper.

Steps to follow:

Each person will take a color. When everyone has it, they must form pairs with people who have a different color than their own.

They will sit in pairs, facing each other and in the middle they will have a continuous piece of paper.

They must draw something they want to share with that person or tell them.

During this time no talking is allowed. Relaxing music can be used to help create a comfortable climate.

The facilitator must be aware of how the relationships flow and how the drawings are made.

Final reflection on what they have felt and how they have expressed it through drawing. Also, about how they felt without being able to talk while drawing.

9- Assertive opposition

Aim

Learn to say “no”.

Time required

30 minutes approximately.

group size

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